Kanoa leahey dating

This is the equipment; you plug in this, there’ll be a radio thing down there, you plug in that, and then you’ll hear the engineer, and then you talk to him again.

So, he says: This is your ticket to get in, this is your ticket to get into the arena.

Jim Leahey is an iconic name in the world of Hawai‘i sports broadcasting. I mean, he really loved his children, he really loved his family, but he knew as a chief petty officer, a journalist chief petty officer in the Navy, which he stayed in after World War II, and he married my mother a month after the attack, he needed something else.

For thousands of games, his voice brought University of Hawai‘i athletics into our living rooms. James Charles Leahey, sometimes called Kimo, but better known as Jim, retired in June 2018 from a career that spanned more than sixty years in sports broadcasting. That was the greatest defeat in the history of the United States Navy; it has affected me greatly.

I said: Well, you have to know the players, you have to study the statistics, you have to know the trends that are going to happen.

And people that come up to me and said: You know, I’m gonna do my first game.

Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox features engaging, akamai, one-on-one conversations with some of the most intriguing people in Hawai‘i. So, he was able to make a living at it, and he was able to, you know, push it out.

In addition to broadcasting the Monday-Friday sportscasts, he is also a play-by-play Announcer for high school sports on Oceanic Cable and for college basketball on the ESPN networks, as well as co-host of Leahey & Leahey, a weekly talk show featured on PBS Hawaii with his father, Jim (Leahey & Leahey Live).

And three—and you’ll get this; never, ever trust broadcast management.

How many people will listen, how many sponsors will we get, how much do we have to pay the announcer, how much do we have to, you know, pay for the rights, and all kinds of stuff.

But when you’re asked who are the people who’ve influenced you most, two of them are from broadcast management: Bob Sevey and Rick Blangiardi. So, he had the best crew in Hawai‘i, and you were one of them, that supplied that for him. I was teaching school at Campbell High School in ‘Ewa Beach. So, he came in, and he came into my classroom and he sat down, and he said: Can I talk to you?

Bob Sevey was my idol, Bob Sevey was my mentor, Bob Sevey was—well, you worked for him too. And he had to say things like: I want three sources on this story before we put it on the air; I’m not gonna go with this, I want three sources. So, he looks at me and he says: Joe Moore is leaving for Channel 2 to do the news; we want you to do the sports at six and at ten.

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